Forward Kenosha
Promoting Peace & Ensuring Dignity

Our Voice

Our Voice.

Remarks to Kenosha County Board

I am here tonight as a woman, mother, advocate and ally, to speak about the Resolution Towards the Equal Application of Justice being presented before the board.

The role of Attorney General requires unbiased implementation of the law. One of the most important pieces to this is ensuring equal protection under the law of vulnerable, and often marginalized members of our society. Jeff Sessions has demonstrated on countless occasions that he is unable to separate his personal beliefs and the law.

As a woman, I question his lack of commitment to the support of the rights of those who share my gender. In 2013, he voted against the re authorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which provides response and support to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, date violence and stalking. He has also shown questionable judgment when it comes to what constitutes sexual assault.

As a mother, I question the view held by Jeff Sessions when it comes to children with disabilities. His view of the Individuals with Disabilities Act was that  it may be the “single most irritating problem for teachers throughout America today”, and he suggested that accommodations for students with disabilities are “a big factor in the decline in civility and discipline in America's classrooms. In addition, while serving as Alabama's attorney general, he fought against an order from an Alabama circuit court judge requesting that the state fix the inequitable funding, which had been preventing the poorest districts from providing even basic services to students in need.

As an ally to the LGBTQ community, I question his ability to provide this section of our society equal protection under the law. In response to the Supreme Court Ruling on gay marriage, he stated, that the highest courts had “redefined a sacred and ancient institution.” Continuing to say “It is not an act of courage but supreme arrogance to pretend that the wisdom of five judges is greater than all the men and women who have voted upon this issue in the 50 states, and the men and women whose convictions have defined the course of western civilization,”

He opposed the Matthew Shepard Act, which expanded the definition of a hate crime to include motives based on gender, gender identity, sexual orientation and disability, citing that he didn't believe it was necessary.

I am proud that this community has had the foresight to offer a Resolution in condemnation of Mr. Session’s appointment. I implore each of you to vote yes to adopting this resolution.

Gina Walkington                                                                                                                   February 7, 2016